Principles to sustain the value of the ocean now and for the future

The world is connected, not divided, by…

What we do to re-establish the natural systems that clean and protect us?

back·wash

/ˈbakˌwôSH,ˈbakˌwäSH/
(noun)

· The cleaning of a filter by reversing the flow;

· The backward current of water or air created by the motion of an object through it;

· The motion of receding waves.

Where I live, water is precious. Supply is limited to what can be drawn from…

A series exploring specific initiatives, novel technologies and other advancements to improve efficiency and safety of aquaculture as a positive contribution to out future food supply and global health

Artistic rendering of an unmanned offshore fish farm facility currently under development in Trondheim, Norway. © SINTEF

Aquaculture as we have known it to date is based on the idea of pens floating offshore filled with fish susceptible to disease, fed and treated with feed loaded with antibiotics, generating notorious amounts of waste, and vulnerable to breech, thus the escape of possibly sick or mutated fish into…

A series exploring specific initiatives, novel technologies and other advancements to improve efficiency and safety of aquaculture as a positive contribution to out future food supply and global health

In this short series we are focusing on the future of aquaculture, specifically the disruptive aspects of new technologies. These discussions are based on an assumption that traditional fisheries are so stressed and threatened by global, over-consumptive activities that, despite well-intended policies and regulations, lack of restricting market forces, regulations…

A series exploring specific initiatives, novel technologies and other advancements to improve efficiency and safety of aquaculture as a positive contribution to out future food supply and global health

Aquaculture prawn ponds, Queensland, Australia
CSIRO Science, Creative Commons

If we do not do something urgently to counter pressure through consumption and illegal fishing, we will face a crisis in protein supply to feed the growing world population, an estimated 40% of whom today are reliant on the sea food as their essential source of protein.

We have exhausted…

By Paul J. Baicich for World Ocean Forum

A group of Atlantic Puffins and Razorbills on Machias Seal Island, 16 km (10 mi) southeast of Cutler, Maine. Credit: Ray Hennessy @rayhennessy on Unsplash

For many decades, bird researchers and conservationists have been challenged by the mysteries of seabirds. By default, studies were historically limited to accessible nesting sites and nearby feeding areas. For example, and within the last half century, some very impressive mapping of…

Sea level rise and coastal inundation are changing the agricultural landscape around the world.

Scientists are working on halophytic (salt-loving) plants, including Salicornia bigelovii samphire (pictured). It is hoped that salt-tolerant agricultural ingredients will become staples of a global diet in a world where freshwater irrigation is increasingly unstable. Image credit: ICBA

Intense weather events are calling attention to not just local but worldwide water crises caused by climate. Coastal inundation, community disruption, dislocation and recovery are problems that we seem increasingly unable to withstand. The concept of “sponge cities” are a revolutionary planning tool to integrate urban design with water management strategies such as ground conditions, road and construction patterns and more, to create responses to rapidly changing coastal conditions.

In the south Atlantic, the coincidence of warm ocean water and humid air temperature, wind and evaporation creates weather phenomenon known as tropical cyclones or hurricanes, enhanced over the past decade by changing climate circumstances into intense weather events that threaten the islands of the Caribbean, the southern eastern coast…

Visualization as a powerful tool for understanding

The Spilhaus Projection World Ocean Map was developed in 1942 by Dr. Athelstan Spilhaus. Centered in Antarctica, the world oceans come together to form a singular, connected, contiguous body of water. Photo credit: StoryMaps ArcGIS

World Ocean Observatory

Dedicated to sharing information about ocean issues: climate to trade, culture to governance. The sea connects all things. Online at WorldOceanObservatory.org.

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